I Found $90 Last Week but Can’t Find the Owner. Now What?

Maybe you read the story. I saw a man drop $90 on the subway last week, but he disappeared before I could return it. I wasn’t sure what to do next, so I did what I know: I wrote about it.

I spoke to a philosophy professor, a lawyer and a transit official, asking each what to do. I published what they said, hoping the story might reach the owner. Then I waited.

Since then, I’ve heard from dozens of readers, but not the man. Improbably, my moral dilemma expanded: On Tuesday, I found even more money, a pair of $20 bills, on a sidewalk near my home.

So what am I going to to do with all this cash?

When I found the $40, it was nighttime and I was walking my dog, Kevin, with a friend. Nobody else was around. With no way to confirm a claim to ownership, I plan to donate the money to GiveWell, a nonprofit that maintains a short list of charities that make especially effective use of donations.

How a ‘Monster’ Texas Oil Field Made the U.S. a Star in the World Market

MIDLAND, Tex. — In a global collapse of oil prices five years ago, scores of American oil companies went bankrupt. But one field withstood the onslaught, and even thrived: the Permian Basin, straddling Texas and New Mexico.

A combination of technical innovation, aggressive investing and copious layers of oil-rich shale have transformed the Permian, once considered a worn-out patch, into the world’s second-most-productive oil field.

And this transformation has apparently inoculated Texas against its traditional economic enemy, the boom-and-bust cycle pegged to oil prices.

Even now, with prices still far below their peak, the Permian is bursting with production and exploration, and the biggest concern is how to create more capacity to get all that oil to market.

The shale-drilling frenzy in the Permian has enabled the United States not only to reduce crude-oil imports, but even to become a major exporter for the first time in half a century. Its bounty has also empowered the United States diplomatically, allowing it to impose sanctions on Iran and Venezuela without worrying much about increasing gasoline prices.

Tech Is Splitting the U.S. Work Force in Two

A small group of well-educated professionals enjoys rising wages, while most workers toil in low-wage jobs with few chances to advance.

PHOENIX — It’s hard to miss the dogged technological ambition pervading this sprawling desert metropolis.

There’s Intel’s $7 billion, seven-nanometer chip plant going up in Chandler. In Scottsdale, Axon, the maker of the Taser, is hungrily snatching talent from Silicon Valley as it embraces automation to keep up with growing demand. Start-ups in fields as varied as autonomous drones and blockchain are flocking to the area, drawn in large part by light regulation and tax incentives. Arizona State University is furiously churning out engineers.

And yet for all its success in drawing and nurturing firms on the technological frontier, Phoenix cannot escape the uncomfortable pattern taking shape across the American economy: Despite all its shiny new high-tech businesses, the vast majority of new jobs are in workaday service industries, like health care, hospitality, retail and building services, where pay is mediocre.

A new study reveals that professional golf causes serious back problems

As golf has evolved over the last two decades, golfers’ swing has become more powerful, which has led to a higher incidence of early lumbar degeneration, according to a new study published today.

The work, published in the Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine, responds to the causes of the most common injury that now affects golfers, something that did not happen in the past.

“Among professional and amateur golfers, back disorders are still the most common injury, and comprise 55% and 35% of the injuries in these groups, respectively,” according to the research by Corey Walker, Juan Uribe. and Randall Porter, of the Neurological Institute of Barrow (Arizona).

The authors also point out that modern professional golfers are experiencing back problems at much younger ages than the general population due to the potentiation of their swing, which generates repetitive traumatic disc disease.

A Mexican referee recovered his job after reporting racism and unjustified dismissal

The president of the Referee Commission of the Mexican Football Federation (FMF), Arturo Brizio Carter, announced that the whistle Adalid Maganda Villalva recovered his work after having denounced acts of racism against him and after having made public that he was unjustifiably dismissed .

The referee returned to training at the FMF facilities for the first time since April 2018 when he was removed from his post. Maganda Villalva has African-American roots, is a native of the town of Huethuetán, municipality of Azoyú, in the state of Guerrero. During a meeting with the head of the commission, Brizio Carter, he received insults such as: “What do you want, black guy?”

“Adalid Maganda returned to the Mexican Football Federation on January 2. He has been training and when he feels strong he will present the physical evidence, there is no grudges, there is nothing of quarrels, all that is over,” said Arturo Brizio.

How to make your own intelligent speaker with the help of a cell phone that you no longer use

In the last two years a great variety of intelligent speakers emerged, that is: speakers that integrate a virtual assistant such as Siri, Alexa or the Google Assistant (Google Assistant).

Now, these assistants are different devices, among them, for example, there is the Google Assistant that is in the phones that have Android Marshmallow (6.0) and onwards.

With this in mind, it is possible to convert a traditional speaker into a smart speaker. You only need to have a mobile with the Google Assistant and follow the following steps:

To know if the mobile integrates the Wizard, simply hold the Home button pressed for a few seconds and say “Ok, Google” to summon it.

In order for the assistant to be attentive to the user’s voice commands, you have to enter the cell configuration menu (by clicking on the nut icon) then go to Google / Search, the assistant and there activate the Voice Match option.

The big red party of Neymar for his birthday (with matching crutches)

The Brazilian Neymar, who this Tuesday has turned 27 years, celebrated with a big ‘red party’ the anniversary. He surrounded himself with his teammates of Paris Saint Germain and some other colleague, like his compatriot Arthur, the Barça, who traveled to the French capital 48 hours from the classic of the Copa del Rey against Real Madrid. Neymar did not allow, at least apparently, that his injury to his right foot – which will prevent him from playing until the beginning of April and which is being treated in Barcelona – would spoil the party, for which he wore red crutches, to match the motto of the night. All attendees had to wear at least one garment of that color.

Vote Now For London’s Worst Public Sculpture

The London Society and London Historians* have joined forces to conduct this most important of polls. Last year, they asked for nominations; dozens were submitted. Now the list has been whittled down to a terrible ten.

The shortlist contains a mix of maligned monuments — from abstract sculptures to (perhaps controversially) war memorials. Some were chosen for sheer ugliness. Others were deemed to be unsuitable for the location, or inappropriate to the subject.

Take a look at the shortlist and cast your vote. Some of the inclusions may surprise.

The ‘winner’ will be announced at a special event on 26 February 2019. The evening will also include a series of talks about Londoners who should be commemorated but aren’t.